In what it calls an effort to “address the issues of racism, sexism and other destructive biases and their impact on naval readiness,” the U.S. Navy is requiring that all sailors pledge to “advocate for and acknowledge all lived experiences and intersectional identities of every Sailor in the Navy.”

The move is a "dangerous precedent" that "is being set by the U.S. Navy as it initiates what amounts to radical socio-cultural-sexual indoctrination of its young service members," Paul Crespo noted in a Feb. 16 analysis for American Defense News.

All who enlist in any branch of the the U.S. military are required by federal statute to take the following oath:

"I, (name of enlistee), do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. (So help me God).

A Navy press release noted that Task Force One Navy (TF1N) "will seek to promptly address the full spectrum of systemic racism, advocate for the needs of underserved communities, work to dismantle barriers and equalize professional development frameworks and opportunities within the Navy."

As reported by The Blaze, the Task Force Navy One leaders created recommendations related to:

• Matters surrounding gender minorities.
• Updating naming ships, buildings, and streets.
• Countering hate speech.
• Health disparities among minorities including nutrition.

The report delivers instructions for commanders on how to interact with fellow Navy members:

"At the command level, we need to: a. Start a dialogue with your superiors, peers and teams and listen to their personal stories and experiences. If we have not directly experienced racism, sexism, ageism, or other forms of discrimination, it is often difficult to realize they exist. However, they do exist in our Navy and country, and it is our responsibility to eliminate them. b. Keep the conversation going. Practice inclusion every day by integrating Sailor and civilian perspectives in early stages of problem-solving and idea generation. In each meeting you have and problem you tackle, include all perspectives to gather varied points of view that will help you make the best decision."

The report also includes the following "TF1N Pledge" for all Navy sailors:

As a key member of Task Force One Navy I will invest the time, attention and empathy required to analyze and evaluate Navy-wide issues related to racism, sexism, ableism and other structural and interpersonal biases.

I pledge to be actively inclusive in the public and private spheres where I live and work, and proactively encourage others to do the same.

I pledge to advocate for and acknowledge all lived experiences and intersectional identities of every Sailor in the Navy.

I pledge to engage in ongoing self-reflection, education and knowledge sharing to better myself and my communities.

I pledge to be an example in establishing healthy, inclusive and team-oriented environments.

I pledge to constructively share all experiences and information gained from activities above to inform the development of Navy-wide reforms.

Crespo concluded: "It is difficult to ascertain whether this is more like George Orwell’s dystopian novel ‘1984,’ or Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in Communist China. No word yet on whether reading Mao’s Little Red Book of his speeches and writings will also be mandated."

The Blaze noted that the Navy "isn't the only military branch breaking away from traditional norms. Starting Feb. 24, women in the United States Army will be permitted to wear ponytails, earrings, lipstick, and nail polish while in their combat uniform."
navy by David Mark is licensed under ixabay
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