On July 26, 1775, Benjamin Franklin became the first Postmaster General of the United States, a position he held under the British Crown before the Revolution.

Franklin's public career began when he organized Pennsylvania's first volunteer militia during threaten attacks from Spanish and French ships.

Franklin then proposed a General Fast, which was approved by the Colony's Council and printed in his Pennsylvania Gazette, December 12, 1747:

"As the calamities of a bloody War ... seem every year more nearly to approach us ...
there is just reason to fear that unless we humble ourselves before the Lord & amend our Ways, we may be chastized with yet heavier Judgments,

We have, therefore, thought fit ... to appoint ... a Day of Fasting & Prayer, exhorting all, both Ministers & People, to observe the same with becoming seriousness & attention, & to join with one accord in the most humble & fervent Supplications;

That Almighty God would mercifully interpose and still the Rage of War among the Nations & put a stop to the effusion of Christian Blood."

Franklin published the sermons of Great Awakening preachers, such as evangelist George Whitefield, which helped spread the Revival.

Franklin established a volunteer fire department, a circulating public library, an insurance company, a city police force, a night watch and the first hospital in America.

He set up the lighting of city streets and was the first to suggest Daylight Savings Time.

He invented bifocal glasses, the Franklin Stove, swim fins, the lightning rod, and coined the electrical terms "positive" and "negative."
©2021, The American Dossier. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy