Dear Liz:

 I decided to start taking Social Security benefits this summer when I turned 62. My monthly benefit is $1,809. My wife turned 62 at the end of last year and started her benefit of $841 a month. I just accepted an unexpected job offer that will pay me more than $130,000 a year. I suspect I should consider suspending my benefit at this point and work as many years with this company as possible.

If I choose to suspend my benefits now and allow my benefits to remain suspended until my full retirement age of 66 years six months, I will pass up benefits of $112,000 over the next 4.5 years. Granted that amount will be overshadowed by the additional new income and the opportunity to contribute to a 401(k), but is it out of the question to continue my current benefit and just pay the 85% tax on the Social Security we receive each year in addition to our other income?

Answer: Social Security is complicated, so it’s not surprising that so many people get the details wrong. Unfortunately, those details can have a huge effect on financial well-being in retirement. The difference between the best claiming decisions and the worst can total more than $250,000, researchers have found.
Source: LA Times
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