Voters and voting rights advocates notched a significant legal victory in Georgia after reaching a settlement in federal court.
Attorney Marc E. Elias noted the upshot of the legal denouement: “Under the terms of a new settlement, Georgia must quickly notify voters when their absentee ballots are rejected, allowing them time to correct problems and have their ballots counted.”
Per the terms of that agreement, election authorities–administered by the secretary of state’s office–must immediately contact voters if their absentee ballots are rejected or otherwise invalidated.

The settlement outlines two distinct time periods for officials to make contact with voters if a rejection occurs: (1) if a voter’s ballot is rejected 12 or more days prior to an election, the voter must be contacted within three business days via email, phone, and regular mail; (2) officials must contact a voter if his or her ballot is rejected eleven days before election day by the next business day using the same methods.

Here’s how the settlement explains things in legalese:

When a timely submitted absentee ballot is rejected, the board of registrars or absentee ballot clerk shall send the elector notice of such rejection and opportunity to cure, as provided by O.C.G.A. § 21-2-386, by mailing written notice, and attempt to notify the elector by telephone and email if a telephone number or email is on the elector’s voter registration record, no later than the close of business on the third business day after receiving the absentee ballot. However, for any timely submitted absentee ballot that is rejected on or after the second Friday prior to Election Day, the board of registrars or absentee ballot clerk shall send the elector notice of such rejection and opportunity to cure, as provided by O.C.G.A. § 21-2-386, by mailing written notice, and attempt to notify the elector by telephone and email if a telephone number or email is on the elector’s voter registration record, no later than close of business on the next business day.
vote by erin_a is licensed under Flickr
©2020, The American Dossier. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy